Discover Your Work’s GPS

By learning the components of your own work’s GPS, you will be able to generate scenes faster, and more efficiently.

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Tough Choices: Character-Informed Dilemmas

(Photo Credit: OffGamers) Since we’re talking about choices, we are obviously talking about characters. Regardless of the genre or the specific situation, it is the character who has to make the choice. An easy choice is almost no choice at all. While the specifics change from character to character, every character will have needs and […]

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Ch 1 Blunders: Missing Beats

(Photo Credit: Imgur) Don’t confuse your readers with illogical flow of sentances and action! Last month, I received some fantastic feedback on the first quarter of my current MS. For this series of articles, I will draw from the remarks of my wonderful Beta readers and discussions I have had with other writers on these […]

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Tough Choices: Genre-informed Dilemmas

(Photo Credit: Pinterest) Since your genre has a specific focus, why not make use of this fact when brainstorming dilemmas? Every genre has built-in reader expectations for focus, issues, stye of world-building, etc. You can exploit built-in assumptions while developing touch choices for your characters. Here are three examples of what I mean… Historical fiction […]

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Exploiting Anger in Conflict: Vary, Develop, Grow

As with other story elements, it isn’t a good idea to simply repeat yourself when you use anger in scenes. Every scene s should grow one or more characters, character relationships with one anotheer, charactr relationships with the world, physical setting, and possibly the backdrop your story takes place against. Vary your scenes. If it […]

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Verbal Fight Scenes: Anger Patterns in Relationships

Photo Credit: EmotionallyVague.com Parent. Love interest. Best friend. Rival. You main character will react differently to anger depending on the nature of the relationship she is in – and the nature of the other person. Luckily for the writer, within the relationship these reactions are  consistent across time (until one character decides to change). Anger […]

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Verbal Fight Scenes: 2 Dysfunctional Anger Types

  Photo Credit: Pinterest   I am going to introduce the Viper and the Ostrich. These are my (impromptu) names for two opposing anger management styles. It might help you, as you develop your characters, to consider them at two ends of a spectrum of dysfunctional styles. Both feel anger and react to it but […]

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