Flash Fiction: Ending

Writing flash fiction can help you identify your audience. Because they are quick to write, you can easily test different types of endings and see which type of endings your target audience best responds to. Or work in reverse and write the endings you like in order to narrow down the identity of your target […]

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Flash Fiction: Middle

  A possible benefit of flash fiction is that the middle is so short. Many people struggle with middles although for me the most difficult part is cutting my middles down to size. Flash fiction emphasizes techniques that can help me do this. But if you are the type who writes your middles too short, […]

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Flash Fiction: Opening

Okay. As part of my learning about flash fiction, I’ve decided to break down the short structure into its opening, middle, and end. While some of the advice will be true for any story, some is especially important for word-limited format. Character: Set up in two sentences. At least one of these sentences should be […]

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Flash Fiction: Why Try It

Maybe it is because my WIP is so long but I’ve recently become interested in flash fiction. Depending on who you ask, flash fiction usually runs between 300 and 1000 words. Micro fiction is even shorter! I am no good at short stories but maybe I will give flash fiction a try. Plot: One benefit […]

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Chase Scenes: the Physical Element

There is so much out there on the physical element of chase scenes. No discussion of chase scenes is complete without it – maybe because it is the most obvious defining element of this type of scene.   World: Remember that the chase scene takes place in the character’s point of view – with a […]

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Chase Scenes: the Mental Element

Oddly, there is very little out on the internet under “writing chase scenes” and “mental” or “emotional”. So I had to figure all this out the hard way… studying lots and lots of chase scenes. Hopefully this series of posts will make things a little easier for future learners.     The mental world is […]

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Chase Scenes: the Reader Element

The chase scene should be written (or revised) with the reader in mind. Like with any other type of scene, the reader interacts with the character or characters but the reader is not the character. Just because the character experiences the chase scene in a certain way does not necessarily mean the reader will have […]

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