Ch 1 Blunders: Premature POV Changes

(Photo Credit: The Metropolitan Museum of Art) Don’t blur your reader’s vision of your story! Last month, I received some fantastic feedback on the first quarter of my current MS. For this series of articles, I will draw from the remarks of my wonderful Beta readers and discussions I have had with other writers on […]

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The Glory of Young Characters

I’ve noticed that main characters, even in adult fiction, tend to be young. Even when they are not young, they are often prone to teen/ young adult traits that foster conflict. Traits like impulsiveness, lack of censorship in dialogue, rebellion, and identity crises. All of these are universal traits that people experience to greater or […]

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Flash Fiction: Opening

Okay. As part of my learning about flash fiction, I’ve decided to break down the short structure into its opening, middle, and end. While some of the advice will be true for any story, some is especially important for word-limited format. Character: Set up in two sentences. At least one of these sentences should be […]

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Flash Fiction: Why Try It

Maybe it is because my WIP is so long but I’ve recently become interested in flash fiction. Depending on who you ask, flash fiction usually runs between 300 and 1000 words. Micro fiction is even shorter! I am no good at short stories but maybe I will give flash fiction a try. Plot: One benefit […]

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Strategies to Reach 50k: Linear/ Nonlinear Approaches

      Basically, you can write a story in two ways: you can write front to back (linear) or you can skip around (nonlinear). Both approaches have their advantages and disadvantages.        The linear approach is probably what first comes to mind for a writing strategy since you read a book in a linear fashion. It […]

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Panster Help: When Your Story Stalls

If you are doing NaNoWriMo, then about now things start to slide. The story stalls as you something doesn’t pan out, you hit a dead end, or a character doesn’t work out. These problems may be especially prevalent among pansters – people who write “by the seat of their pants” instead of by an outline. […]

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Pantster Help: Moving Forward Without Plot

Some people prefer not to plot or can’t plot without loosing the drive to write. In writing lingo, this person is called a “panster” while people who prefer to plot are called “plotters”. Because they have at best has only a vague idea of where the story will go, pansters face some unique challenges. The […]

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