Tough Choices: Character-Informed Dilemmas

(Photo Credit: OffGamers) Since we’re talking about choices, we are obviously talking about characters. Regardless of the genre or the specific situation, it is the character who has to make the choice. An easy choice is almost no choice at all. While the specifics change from character to character, every character will have needs and […]

Rate this:

Tough Choices: Genre-informed Dilemmas

(Photo Credit: Pinterest) Since your genre has a specific focus, why not make use of this fact when brainstorming dilemmas? Every genre has built-in reader expectations for focus, issues, stye of world-building, etc. You can exploit built-in assumptions while developing touch choices for your characters. Here are three examples of what I mean… Historical fiction […]

Rate this:

Exploiting Anger in Conflict: Vary, Develop, Grow

As with other story elements, it isn’t a good idea to simply repeat yourself when you use anger in scenes. Every scene s should grow one or more characters, character relationships with one anotheer, charactr relationships with the world, physical setting, and possibly the backdrop your story takes place against. Vary your scenes. If it […]

Rate this:

Suspense in Dialogue

There are many ways to introduce suspense into dialogue. Suspense is the element of uncertainty. What is going on? What will happen next? Because dialogue is “people telling other people things”, you may wonder how the sharing of information can lead to uncertainty. Revelations: The realization that things are not as they seemed a minute […]

Rate this:

Flash Fiction: Ending

Writing flash fiction can help you identify your audience. Because they are quick to write, you can easily test different types of endings and see which type of endings your target audience best responds to. Or work in reverse and write the endings you like in order to narrow down the identity of your target […]

Rate this:

Flash Fiction: Middle

  A possible benefit of flash fiction is that the middle is so short. Many people struggle with middles although for me the most difficult part is cutting my middles down to size. Flash fiction emphasizes techniques that can help me do this. But if you are the type who writes your middles too short, […]

Rate this:

Pantster Help: Moving Forward Without Plot

Some people prefer not to plot or can’t plot without loosing the drive to write. In writing lingo, this person is called a “panster” while people who prefer to plot are called “plotters”. Because they have at best has only a vague idea of where the story will go, pansters face some unique challenges. The […]

Rate this: