Ch 1 Blunders: Generic Settings

(Photo Credit: Popupology) Don’t leave the reader guessing about where the story takes place! Last month, I received some fantastic feedback on the first quarter of my current MS. For this series of articles, I will draw from the remarks of my wonderful Beta readers and discussions I have had with other writers on these […]

Rate this:

Ch 1 Blunders: Floating Characters

(Photo Credit: Pinterest) Don’t leave your characters to float in a vacuum! Last month, I received some fantastic feedback on the first quarter of my current MS. For this series of articles, I will draw from the remarks of my wonderful Beta readers and discussions I have had with other writers on these topics. In […]

Rate this:

Wield Description Like a Sword

Description is a double-edged sword. You can slay your reader or liberate him. It all depends on how you wield your sword. Too much description can kill reader imagination. Good books capture the readers imagination. Too much description, and you chain the reader to your vision. Yes, description grounds the reader. Yes, description sets mood. […]

Rate this:

Different Ways to Start a Scene: Part 2

Most people have a favorite way to start a scene and a chapter. One way usually comes more naturally. But variety is important for the reader and for the writer. Why is it important for you? Because different types of openings have different effects. They resume the story at different points in the stimulus – […]

Rate this:

Different Ways to Start a Scene: Part 1

Most people have a favorite way to start a scene and a chapter. One way usually comes more naturally. But variety is important for the reader and for the writer. Why is it important for you? Because different types of openings have different effects. They resume the story at different points in the stimulus – […]

Rate this:

Braiding a Dialogue Scene

There is more to dialogue than talking heads. Dialogue scenes have four threads that may or may not be enclosed in quotation marks. Talk is what makes a dialogue scene, of course. Characters communicating and clashing through words. That is the first thread. The second thread is description. Description is difficult to handle through talking […]

Rate this: