Chase Scenes: the Physical Element

There is so much out there on the physical element of chase scenes. No discussion of chase scenes is complete without it – maybe because it is the most obvious defining element of this type of scene.   World: Remember that the chase scene takes place in the character’s point of view – with a […]

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Chase Scenes: the Mental Element

Oddly, there is very little out on the internet under “writing chase scenes” and “mental” or “emotional”. So I had to figure all this out the hard way… studying lots and lots of chase scenes. Hopefully this series of posts will make things a little easier for future learners.     The mental world is […]

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Chase Scenes: the Reader Element

The chase scene should be written (or revised) with the reader in mind. Like with any other type of scene, the reader interacts with the character or characters but the reader is not the character. Just because the character experiences the chase scene in a certain way does not necessarily mean the reader will have […]

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Time-Saving Tactics: Try Half-Drafts

By Alina Chase       When all you’re trying to do is capture thoughts,  develop ideas and explore possibilities, why restrict yourself to sentences, paragraphs and chapters?  Nothing will bring your train of thought to a screeching halt faster than stopping to ponder a comma or word choice or sentence structure. If you scribble and draw […]

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Personal Philosophy: Priorities

      No series on personal philosophies would be complete without a look at priorities. Priorities help you get on track, stay on track, and even find the track in the first place. Your priorities reflect both your ideal and your actual creative life-style. Your choices affect both long-term and short-term creativity, productivity, and stamina (some […]

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Personal Philosophy: Critics and Critiques

      This isn’t a how-to for how to deal with criticism. It’s about identifying your personal philosophy about them. Love them, hate them, fear them, avoid them. But why? And what are your ideal critic and ideal critique?       Let’s start at the end. What is your ideal critique? I would love for someone to […]

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Personal Philosophy: What It All Means

      What makes any book great? Great plots, characters, settings, and world immediately come to mind. So does a narrative style that pulls the reader into these and leaves the “real” world behind. But all that is common advice, not necessarily personal philosophy. What’s really important is what “great” means to you.       Great can […]

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