Ch 1 Blunders: Starting Too Late

(Photo Credit:  Pinterest) Don’t let readers leave your book behind! Last month, I received some fantastic feedback on the first quarter of my current MS. For this series of articles, I will draw from the remarks of my wonderful Beta readers and discussions I have had with other writers on these topics. In some ways, […]

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Cliche Traps

(Photo Credit: Ethereal Illuminations blog)   “Once upon a time an evil dragon kidnapped a beautiful princess from her father’s castle. The king offered half the kingdom and her hand in marriage as a reward for her rescue.  A handsome, brave, kind-hearted, orphaned knight with a magic sword slew the dragon and won the princess’s […]

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Ch 1 Blunders: Floating Characters

(Photo Credit: Pinterest) Don’t leave your characters to float in a vacuum! Last month, I received some fantastic feedback on the first quarter of my current MS. For this series of articles, I will draw from the remarks of my wonderful Beta readers and discussions I have had with other writers on these topics. In […]

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Ch 1 Blunders: Starting Too Soon

(Photo Credit: Pinterest) Sometimes you have to wait! Last month, I received some fantastic feedback on the first quarter of my current MS. For this series of articles, I will draw from the remarks of my wonderful Beta readers and discussions I have had with other writers on these topics. In some ways, I started […]

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Tough Choices: Genre-informed Dilemmas

(Photo Credit: Pinterest) Since your genre has a specific focus, why not make use of this fact when brainstorming dilemmas? Every genre has built-in reader expectations for focus, issues, stye of world-building, etc. You can exploit built-in assumptions while developing touch choices for your characters. Here are three examples of what I mean… Historical fiction […]

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Exploiting Anger in Conflict: Vary, Develop, Grow

As with other story elements, it isn’t a good idea to simply repeat yourself when you use anger in scenes. Every scene s should grow one or more characters, character relationships with one anotheer, charactr relationships with the world, physical setting, and possibly the backdrop your story takes place against. Vary your scenes. If it […]

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